Program Description
The Ethnic Studies program explores the social, cultural, and political forces which have shaped the histories of ethnic minorities in a U.S. multicultural society.

Courses and Student Learning Outcomes
Both courses satisfy general education transfer requirements in area D3 for CSU transfer and area 4C for UC transfer.

ETHN 101 – Introduction to Ethnic Studies (3 units)
This course is a historical and cultural survey of ethnic groups and ethnic group relations in the U.S. among Anglos, Native Americans, Asian Americans, African Americans, and Mexican Americans/Latinos from the pre-Colombian period to the present.

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of issues surrounding minority groups in American society today
2. Critically examine and evaluate written text materials, lecture materials, and visual or audio aids such as films, internet or audio files
3. Develop and practice cultural relativity skills while critically examining and evaluating written text materials, lecture materials, classroom discussions, and visual aids such as films or Internet sites
4. Analyze the historical and cultural experiences of the four major ethnic groups in the U.S. (i.e., Native American, African American, Latino/Chicano, Asian American)

ETHN 116 – Introduction to Chicano Studies (3 units)
This course is an introductory survey of Chicano/Latino people in the Unites States; examining race, ethnicity, gender and sexuality, social class, history, politics, institutional discrimination, culture, migration and globalization, literature and the arts.

student ETHN 116 diorama project student ETHN 116 diorama project

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Define Chicano/a Studies and the ways in which the field has developed as a result of the Chicano people
2. Critically examine and evaluate written text materials, lecture materials, and visual or audio aids such as films, internet or audio files
3. Develop and practice cultural relativity skills while critically examining and evaluating written text materials, lecture materials, classroom discussions, and visual aids such as films or Internet sites
4. Analyze the social, cultural and racial status and experiences of Chicanos in America

Faculty
Kimberly Feig – kfeig@citruscollege.edu  
Nancy Quinones – nquinones@citruscollege.edu

What Can You Do with a Major in Ethnic Studies?
Choosing Ethnic Studies as a major will help you acquire and sharpen your critical and creative thinking skills in order to analyze and understand people, communities, institutions, and cultures. An Ethnic Studies degree will also equip you with the following transferable skills: the ability to work effectively with diverse populations, capacity to analyze racial impacts of law and public policy, research skills, team-building and group-centered leadership skills. As such, the knowledge gained in this major can lead to exciting career opportunities in the following fields:
Counseling
Grant Writing
Health/Medicine
Journalism
Law (legal advocacy, lawyer, paralegal)
Marketing
Nonprofit Community Building (including domestic violence shelters, homeless issues, veteran assistance, rape crisis hotlines, substance abuse programs, and LGBTQ centers)
Politics (local, state, and federal)
Public Policy
Teaching (elementary, high school, college/university)
Social Work
Radio/Television (NPR, KPCC, Podcasts)
Urban Planning

Graduate and Professional School Opportunities
Minoring or majoring in Ethnic Studies can be a great foundation for graduate and professional school. There are a number of master's and Ph.D. programs in Asian American, Chicano, Ethnic and Native American Studies. Alternatively, students seeking careers in which a graduate degree is necessary such as law, public policy, social work, counseling, and/or public health, will find that their course work in Ethnic Studies intersects with many of the tracks offered in these programs.